Sea sprite in black clay with yellow, green, red and blue markings
Sea sprite in black clay with yellow, green, red and blue markings
Sea sprite in black clay with yellow, green, red and blue markings

Inspiration
The landscape archetype grew out of both a life drawing practice; where the figure was depicted as though it were a series of valleys and hills; and a reworking of ideas about space and memory.

A form developed that suggested a sense of above and below; sky and land; foreground and background.

The spatial treatment found in Chinese ink painting, and a desire to make tactile the physical sense of the landscape, all fed into shaping the scale and proportions of this anthropomorphic form.

Aesthetically, it is important that the form has a flowing contour, that accelerates and decelerates in harmony with the whole. This flowing line is suggestive of the sense of energy and restlessness found in nature. The lower section implies an undulating foreground and reflects aspects of the female form, while the acceleration towards the upper level, implies an ascendancy to some higher physical or spiritual realm. The central, negative space is integral to a narrative engagement with ideas about emptiness and matter; being and not being.

Outline of the creative process
The making process starts with drawing to scale. This drawing is then used as a guide during the hand-building process. When the clay is relatively damp, rapid construction can take place. As clay firms up, refinements can be made. Towards the end of construction, much care and attention are needed to rectify possible faults as the clay shrinks to its dry state. Depending on the relative humidity of the air, it can take several weeks to dry a form. This can be hastened through the application of a heat gun, but impatience at this stage can be counterproductive.

Once the form has been bisque fired, a two-part press mould can be constructed. The resulting plaster mould will take approximately three weeks to dry.

The mould can be filled with black clay that is impressed with wood chip. The two halves will then be sealed with liquid clay. Once dry, the form will be fired to 1200 degrees, causing dramatic, haptic effects from the wood burn out.

The resulting work will displayed as a free-standing piece, supported by a steel tripod. The metalwork can be forged at a local facility in Plymouth.

Time required to create the work
8 weeks


Sea sprite in black clay with yellow, green, red and blue markings

Regular price
£3,565.00
Sale price
£3,565.00
Unit price
per 

By Alan Braidford

Tax included and free shipping across the UK.

The price listed here is the full price, of which you pay 25% now and the remaining 75% upon receipt of the finished work.

Medium: Ceramic, Steel support

Size: 55cm high, 45cm wide, 10cm deep

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  • Inspiration
    The landscape archetype grew out of both a life drawing practice; where the figure was depicted as though it were a series of valleys and hills; and a reworking of ideas about space and memory.

    A form developed that suggested a sense of above and below; sky and land; foreground and background.

    The spatial treatment found in Chinese ink painting, and a desire to make tactile the physical sense of the landscape, all fed into shaping the scale and proportions of this anthropomorphic form.

    Aesthetically, it is important that the form has a flowing contour, that accelerates and decelerates in harmony with the whole. This flowing line is suggestive of the sense of energy and restlessness found in nature. The lower section implies an undulating foreground and reflects aspects of the female form, while the acceleration towards the upper level, implies an ascendancy to some higher physical or spiritual realm. The central, negative space is integral to a narrative engagement with ideas about emptiness and matter; being and not being.

    Outline of the creative process
    The making process starts with drawing to scale. This drawing is then used as a guide during the hand-building process. When the clay is relatively damp, rapid construction can take place. As clay firms up, refinements can be made. Towards the end of construction, much care and attention are needed to rectify possible faults as the clay shrinks to its dry state. Depending on the relative humidity of the air, it can take several weeks to dry a form. This can be hastened through the application of a heat gun, but impatience at this stage can be counterproductive.

    Once the form has been bisque fired, a two-part press mould can be constructed. The resulting plaster mould will take approximately three weeks to dry.

    The mould can be filled with black clay that is impressed with wood chip. The two halves will then be sealed with liquid clay. Once dry, the form will be fired to 1200 degrees, causing dramatic, haptic effects from the wood burn out.

    The resulting work will displayed as a free-standing piece, supported by a steel tripod. The metalwork can be forged at a local facility in Plymouth.

    Time required to create the work
    8 weeks