The Wall
The Wall
The Wall
The Wall

Inspiration
The concept for this series of pieces began with a question about whether human figures could be used instead of coils to build up a traditionally coiled form. The artist experimented with this technique and found that it results in an effective sculptural form. A wall is a basic component of architectural construction, which allows the interpretations of this piece to be wide-reaching. ‘The Wall’ can be seen as a memorial for lives lost in the name of progress. It shows ambivalence and willingness to sacrifice individuals for gain. A wall has been built, the goal has been reached, and the human cost is secondary. The piece is intentionally uncomfortable, it makes the viewer draw their own associations and potentially confront issues they would ordinarily turn away from. The inspiration and meaning of Anastassia’s work is not fixed and is likely to develop and become clearer through the making process. Explanation about any further development can be provided upon the completion of the piece.

What the work will look like
Organic forms of human figures are piled up into a structured rectangular wall. There is a contrast between the rigidity of the shape of the wall and the natural form of the building blocks. It is hard to distinguish which limb belongs to whom, as the mass of bodies becomes an entity in itself. Not all limbs are complete, some are missing their forearms or whole legs as a nod to damaged marble sculptures. There is no detail in the faces and no detail of fingers or toes; this is to contribute to the anonymity and interpretation of the figures as a whole rather than individuals. The stoneware clay serves as a base and creates the form and is finished with a white glaze.

Outline of the creative process
The entire piece is hand-built from stoneware clay. Each figure is individually sculpted in a different posture; the figures are then stacked on top of each other joining them by scoring and slipping.

Once the form is built up the overall composition of the piece is complete. Any irregularities in the surface can then be refined. The piece is left to dry slowly under plastic to avoid cracking. Once it is bone dry it goes into the kiln for the first time to be bisque fired.

After the kiln reaches temperature and cools down the piece is ready to be glazed. Using a large bucket of dipping glaze, the entire piece is submerged and held in the glaze for several seconds. When the glaze has dried the bottom of the boat is wiped with a wet sponge to prevent it from sticking to the glaze shelf. Once the kiln is fired to cone 6 and cooled, the piece is complete.

Time required to create the work
6 weeks


The Wall

Regular price
£805.00
Sale price
£805.00
Unit price
per 

By Anastassia Zamaraeva

Tax included and free shipping across the UK.

The price listed here is the full price, of which you pay 25% now and the remaining 75% upon receipt of the finished work.

Medium: Stoneware, Glaze

Size: 15cm high, 25cm wide, 7cm deep

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  • Inspiration
    The concept for this series of pieces began with a question about whether human figures could be used instead of coils to build up a traditionally coiled form. The artist experimented with this technique and found that it results in an effective sculptural form. A wall is a basic component of architectural construction, which allows the interpretations of this piece to be wide-reaching. ‘The Wall’ can be seen as a memorial for lives lost in the name of progress. It shows ambivalence and willingness to sacrifice individuals for gain. A wall has been built, the goal has been reached, and the human cost is secondary. The piece is intentionally uncomfortable, it makes the viewer draw their own associations and potentially confront issues they would ordinarily turn away from. The inspiration and meaning of Anastassia’s work is not fixed and is likely to develop and become clearer through the making process. Explanation about any further development can be provided upon the completion of the piece.

    What the work will look like
    Organic forms of human figures are piled up into a structured rectangular wall. There is a contrast between the rigidity of the shape of the wall and the natural form of the building blocks. It is hard to distinguish which limb belongs to whom, as the mass of bodies becomes an entity in itself. Not all limbs are complete, some are missing their forearms or whole legs as a nod to damaged marble sculptures. There is no detail in the faces and no detail of fingers or toes; this is to contribute to the anonymity and interpretation of the figures as a whole rather than individuals. The stoneware clay serves as a base and creates the form and is finished with a white glaze.

    Outline of the creative process
    The entire piece is hand-built from stoneware clay. Each figure is individually sculpted in a different posture; the figures are then stacked on top of each other joining them by scoring and slipping.

    Once the form is built up the overall composition of the piece is complete. Any irregularities in the surface can then be refined. The piece is left to dry slowly under plastic to avoid cracking. Once it is bone dry it goes into the kiln for the first time to be bisque fired.

    After the kiln reaches temperature and cools down the piece is ready to be glazed. Using a large bucket of dipping glaze, the entire piece is submerged and held in the glaze for several seconds. When the glaze has dried the bottom of the boat is wiped with a wet sponge to prevent it from sticking to the glaze shelf. Once the kiln is fired to cone 6 and cooled, the piece is complete.

    Time required to create the work
    6 weeks